Polish economy News [Polish business]

Polish economy News

September 15, 2015
Of Polish economy - News
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  • In this July 24, 2015 photo, Radek Ciszewski, left, and Marek Bogacki, discuss how far Poland has come since throwing off communism 26 years ago, in Warsaw, Poland. Ciszewki, a consultant, and Bogacki, a director at an insurance company, are among the Poles are doing well thanks to a quarter century of constant economic growth. However, there are still many Poles who remain trapped in low wages and insecure job conditions, creating social frustration that has come to the surface in a year of political elections. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) (The Associated Press)
  • In this July 16, 2015 photo, Michal Nowocien, 22, stands in the tiny bedroom he shares with his two brothers in Pionki, Poland. Space is so tight that the three boys sleep in narrow beds bunked three high. They live in a public housing project where many people are either unemployed or live on very low wages. A quarter century after the fall of communism, the gap between the haves and have-nots is wide, leading some to speak of there being “two Polands.” The social frustrations this has created are coming to the surface in a year of political elections, with voters angry at the pro-market party that has led the county for eight years. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz) (The Associated Press)
  • In this July 20, 2015 photo, the modern city skyline is seen from the Palace of Culture in Warsaw, Poland. For years, Poland’s economy has grown, creating an economic boom in cities like Warsaw. But many small towns have not seen the improvement, and now voters are frustrated and threatening to throw out the pro-business ruling party Civic Platform in October elections.Two Polands-4.jpg They already ousted a president in May who seemed out of touch with the daily struggle of regular Poles. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski) (The Associated Press)
  • In this July 16, 2015 photo a cyclist rides through a small market square in the town of Pionki, Poland. Despite an economic boom in Poland that has benefited many, there are huge numbers of Poles living with low wages and job insecurity, often in small towns like Pionki, population 20, 000. The situation that has led more than 2 million of Poland's 38 million to choose to work abroad in recent years and is causing voters to turn against the pro-market policies of the governing Civic Platform party. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz) (The Associated Press)
  • This July 16, 2015 photo, shows a housing area in the town of Pionki, Poland. Despite an economic boom in Poland that has benefited many, there are huge numbers of Poles living with low wages and job insecurity, often in small towns like Pionki, population 20, 000. The situation that has led more than 2 million of Poland's 38 million to choose to work abroad in recent years and is causing voters to turn against the pro-market policies of the governing Civic Platform party. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz) (The Associated Press)

PIONKI, Poland – Marek Bogacki feels life in Poland 26 years after the fall of communism could hardly be better.

Wearing a fine shirt and tie and enjoying brunch at a French bakery in Warsaw, the 35-year-old investment director at an insurance company ticked off places where he has vacationed, from New York to Thailand to Paris, saying the prosperity and freedom that came with EU membership has made it "the best time in Poland's history."

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